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20100920
20100920
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
WETA
Sep 20, 2010 6:30pm EDT
counts. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive down unemployment, and we're not even ac
WETA
Sep 20, 2010 12:00pm EDT
through literature and you can find out by talking. and you can find out by using your imagination. and for an appelate judge that's important. because when you're in that room, as you are, and writing and reading, what you are goinging to write is going to affect other people. so it's very important to have the imagination to try to understand how your opinions and your decisions will affect the lives of others. >> rose: why are things that you read like literature important to a judge? >> i told a group of undergraduates here in new york a few weeks ago when i was asked that question. and i said it's like knowing a foreign language or reading a novel. we only have one life. and we only really know our own. but by reading novels and by reading what other people have written about life, and about different ways of living, you can lead more lives than your own. and you can understand how people could have lived a quite different life. and that's a wonderful privilege to be able to do that as well as i think a necessity for someone whose's goinging to affect the lives of other people
WETA
Sep 20, 2010 6:00pm EDT
sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show us what they achieved, all the project have -- how the province has prospered and how much safer and has become, but this is what we saw. [gunshots fired] a brutal fight for much of the day. it does not happen much anymore, but it shows the taliban battling coalition troops. and now america must finish the job britain started. no british troops at this time, they have faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about. without someone having been there, you cannot describe the smells, the sites, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to be there and, the emotions -- to have a true understanding of what people here go through. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet mellon for the troops. there happen -- they are happy to be going, but their regret the mission is far from over. >> the amount of effort, time, lives lost, i feel a little hollow that we did not break this place. we did not bring it to our way of thinking. it is definitely -- i feel heartbroken we did not finish it. thever, i'm 10
WETA
Sep 20, 2010 7:00pm EDT
worden, thank you for joining us. tell us what you saw this weekend during the voting. >> well, i was stationed in kabul as an observer. and i visited about ten different stations throughout the city, some in more rural areas, some right in the heart of town. and in the polling stations that i saw, there were relatively few problems. there were plenty of voters. the procedures went along smoothly. and really people were out to vote and were-- seemed to be happy with the process. >> ifill: so how was the turnout. i heard reports that turnout was supposed to be considered spotty. >> yes, i think that's true. certainly the areas that i was seeing had good security. they were right around kabul and there were very visible police presence around the city. so it is not surprising that the turnout was relatively good. i think most of the polling stations we saw were at least half full. however, as you know, the security situation in much of the country throughout the country was a lot worse. and that had a significant impact on turnout. and i think that turnout can be expected to be very
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4